Sign Up for our Newsletter Today!





Join the Gowanus Canal Conservancy on Facebook

Instagram

Visit our Blog!

Contribute To The Conservancy

We need your support to build an Open, Clean and Alive Gowanus Canal Watershed!
 

Event Calendar

Get a glimpse of all of our upcoming events!

More >

2,000 Gallon Project

The 2,000 Gallon Project reimagines the common commercial dumpster to make a visual statement about how retaining stormwater can help prevent combined sewage overflow (CSO) into the Gowanus Canal.

More >

Rainwater Harvesting Workshops

The GCC will be hosting a series of workshops on the environmental challenges of the Gowanus Canal and the Green Infrastructure measures taking place in the neighborhood. View upcoming workshop dates here.

More >
 

2,000 Gallon Project

The 2,000 Gallon Project reimagines the common commercial dumpster to make a visual statement about how retaining stormwater can help prevent combined sewage overflow (CSO) into the Gowanus Canal. The Canal, in the heart of Brooklyn, is one of America’s most polluted waterways. Its watershed consists of approximately 1,800 acres of densely developed land, and homes for 122,000 residents, who contribute to the annual 377 million gallons of CSO into the Canal. New York City is investing in grey and green infrastructure throughout the Watershed to lessen CSOs, including about 90 curbside rain gardens, or bioswales, and two large sewage detention tanks totalling 12 million gallons of storage. These projects will have substantive impacts on the amount of untreated sewage entering the Canal, but will not solve the problem entirely. Each dumpster is 2,000 gallons - the amount of stormwater managed by each new bioswale - and serve as an aboveground visualization of the physical volume of managed stormwater. Each and every person that lives, works or plays in the Gowanus Watershed can contribute to the solution, by lessening water use during storms and retaining stormwater at their home, school or business to achieve 0 gallons of CSO into the Canal, and make the Gowanus Blue.

Watch our progress as we plant and deploy 10 dumpsters!

Help us plant! Email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for more info.

Help make Gowanus Blue! Residents, businesses and schools can learn how to make a rainwater harvesting system at our free workshop series.

GCC Pop-Up Nursery

Every Saturday
Times subject to change - see calendar for updates*
Carroll St. & Nevins St, Brooklyn, NY 11215

*Our Summer hours are shorter due to the heat! Please be sure to check the calendar for updates.

This growing season, check out our Pop-Up Nursery at the corner of Carroll & Nevins! Volunteers and students will be helping us grow a wide array of mostly native plants well-adapted to our urban conditions. These plants will be installed in gardens throughout the Watershed, and are also for sale. See list of plants currently available here.

Thanks to Alloy for hosting and Greenbelt Native Plant Center for supporting our 2016 Nursery.

  

Gowanus ArtLab Workshops

Location: Whole Foods Esplanade, SW Corner, 214 3rd St, Brooklyn 11215
[Click here for exact location]


View all workshops here.

ArtLab Gowanus is a popup structure on the Whole Foods Esplanade that will host monthly site-specific FREE art workshops, taught by local artists.

The “lab” is a steel-framed pop-up structure that provides flexible workspace for groups and individuals. There are built-in work surfaces, as well as storage for smaller drawing boards that participants can borrow for use in the nearby bench seating or around the neighborhood.

Sedums will inhabit the green roof, capturing and retaining rainwater before it makes its way into the canal; the floor will additionally feature a watershed mural. The structure thus becomes an educational opportunity itself while it hosts other workshops.

By offering a space along the canal for site-specific art-making, this structure places value on different ways of seeing an often maligned water body and its surrounding neighborhood. It acts as a new lens along the Gowanus Canal, opening up opportunities for discovery through art and stewardship.

      

Rainwater Harvesting Workshops

Lenny RWH SystemIn partnership with GrowNYC, GCC is building a modular Rainwater Harvesting System to capture rainfall at our compost and nursery site. The project will have multiple benefits of capturing rainwater used to irrigate plants, prevent pollution by minimizing combined sewer overflow, provide a shaded workspace for volunteers working on composting and plant propagation, and for school-age and adult visitors to participate in workshops and activities. It will also provide a way to get shelter from the rain and act as a demonstration of what homeowners and gardeners can do at their own site.

We will be hosting workshops throughout 2016. Learn how to implement your own GI system, including how to build your own rainwater harvesting system using rain barrels.

Where Does Your Water Come From? Where Does It Go?
Learn more at an upcoming event:
Sun, August 21, 11am-12:30pm - Meeting Location: GCC Nursery, 431 Carroll St, Brooklyn, NY 11215

RSVP through the Google Survey here. 

In partnership with GrowNYC, learn about what you can do to help prevent Combined Sewer Overflows in New York City. Whenever it rains, raw sewage is dumped untreated into New York City water-bodies like the Gowanus Canal. In this hands on workshop, learn about this problem and come away with ideas about what you can do from adopting a bioswale, to building your own rainwater harvesting system. More info here.

View all workshop dates here.

Funding provided by the NYS Pollution Prevention Institute through a grant from the NYS Pollution Prevention Institute or the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Environmental Conservation.

The Gowanus Canal Conservancy is an independent environmental 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization formed in 2006. More >